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Bkimble8

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Reply with quote  #1 
What’s everyone favorite tandem rig? do u prefer heavier fly on top or bottom
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Critter

Rainbow Trout
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Reply with quote  #2 
I like a bigger fly on the top. Like a stonefly nymph. Helps get it down plus acts as an attractor. On the bottom (22-18 inches below), I like a more natural looking fly such as a sz 16 p tail or hares ear. Good luck!
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Gill

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Reply with quote  #3 
A larger BH Prince up top, 16-20 HE, PT, or muskrat nymphon bottom.
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Bum

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Reply with quote  #4 
so... I'm terrible at fly fishing... I really need to spend some time with guys who know what the F they are doing... I always assumed you used one big fly that floated, then dropped a nymph off of it to bounce around the bottom...

two nymph tandem rigs are a thing?

I'm simple sorry...

and to answer your question.. in my limited experiences... I have always used a big honking stimulator on top or maybe a hopper... and a little nymph of some sort off the tail end. 
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McFishin

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Reply with quote  #5 
I like a buggy/fuzzy (usually a fuzzy bead head hares ear or pheasant tail) looking heavier top nymph to both help keep the rig down and hide the knots. My back fly is usually some kind of similar soft hackle or similar emerger type pattern connected to the top fly with a smaller tippet than up high so it can be free flowing and get the most natural drift. I don’t really use a whole lot of different patterns, just have multiple sizes and colors of each of those two so I can match about whatever’s hatching.
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WVUPSC

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Reply with quote  #6 
I'm not the most experienced flyfisher on here, by far... but here's what I've had some success with:

A good floating dry fly with a smallish (16/20) soft hackle behind it.

A good floating dry fly with a midge nymph (26-32) behind it (if somewhat shallow water)

A larger buggy nymph (16/18 PT, hares ear, etc.) with a midge PT trailing

Sometimes I basically just use a large humpy, haystack or elk hair caddis (i.e., a "good floating dry fly) as the strike indicator for my nymph, if the water isn't too deep.  Or I might use a more delicate dry fly as the indicator if I'm using a tiny emerger fished just below the film.
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cling

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Reply with quote  #7 
Bum - 

You can tandem two dries, a dry and a wet/nymph, or two wet/nymphs.

To the original question, I like the heavier nymph first then trail a smaller, lighter nymph off the back of that. Even a dead drifted and heavy wooly bugger works as the first nymph when you really need to get deep.

My most successful tandem rig is something I do frequently on brookie streams...an elk hair caddis with a black hair's ear or a copper john underneath. I've found this rig especially good on those warm early spring days when there are black stones hatching. The EHC (especially if black) works on any fish looking up, but most fish come on the nymph.

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DrArbo

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Reply with quote  #8 
Good information up there. I echo what was previously said. Bigger fly up front with a  smaller trailer. I will touch on something else while nymph fishing really clear water. I like to put a sz. 16 egg up front with a small 22-26 ptail or whatever you like off the back. You can see the egg drifting and almost bank on your trailer fly to make nearly the same drift behind it. This is useful to see whether or not your drift is lined up with an active fish. Works best obviously if you can see the fish feeding, but it is really cool to see the egg drift by a fish and then you see the fin flick/mouth open. SET! This worked very well up on Big Spring near Carlisle where we were fighting spooky fish and super clear water.
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ZAK

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Reply with quote  #9 
You can even tandem streamers... nymph/streamer rigs as well. The combos are endless. 
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Bigdan

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Reply with quote  #10 
For smallmouth I love two streamers. A smaller one followed by a larger one. It looks like a little fish getting ready to be eaten. I think it triggers the instinct of similar sized fish wanting to steal the first one and larger fish wanting to take the one in back. Double hook ups are not uncommon. 
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Crow

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Reply with quote  #11 
I use various dropper rigs (hopper+beadhead, big stone+little beadhead, caddis+emerger are my favorites), but I've never had much luck throwing a streamer with a little beadhead behind it.  Maybe I'm missing something?   I just haven't gotten much interest on it while the rig is in motion.  Dead-drifting, yes, but streamer+beadhead in motion hasn't brought me success...
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Brookie

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Reply with quote  #12 
A lot depends on where you are putting your weight, and what hatch/fly you are trying to mimic. 

I have been fishing mainly soft hackles and emergers instead of nymphs so much so I like to have the dropper move a little more freely in the water column, unweighted.  

Sometimes I go with a straight line with nymphs and weight evenly proportioned, kinda like czech nymphing technique or "high sticking". 

Like mentioned above, there are lots of different combos and ways... Play around and see what works best for you 

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caddiscrazy

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Reply with quote  #13 
Having the heavier fly first seems to roll cast better for me. I usually run a heavy stonefly with a bead head prince or another natural smaller nymph underneath.
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DrewFlu33

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Reply with quote  #14 
I always like split shotting the hell out of a two nymph rig then running 2 weightless nymphs behind the weight.  Seems that flies that are themselves not weighted always perform better for me.  My inkling is that they flutter in the current more erratically.  As I've heard and said many times, "If you think you have enough weight, double it."  Clearly this doesn't apply if fish are feeding up in the column. 
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