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Stone_Lake_Views

Rainbow Trout
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Posts: 513
Reply with quote  #1 
I was out fishing today and saw a guy with 4 fish on a stringer. He had 3 browns and a smaller brookie. But it was the small Brookie, maybe 7-8 inches, that caught my eye because it looked like it had whirling disease. I say that because it was all scrunched up and looked like other fish I have seen with whirling disease in pictures. This was in Upshur County in stocked waters. Has anyone else seen fish like that in WV?

Is it dangerous to eat fish with whirling disease?
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curmudgeon

Tiger Trout
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Posts: 1,728
Reply with quote  #2 
Most likely a birth defect in the hatchery. It happens when you raise 1000's of inbred trout. My daddy married his sister and it didn't hurt me sort of thing.
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Longspurwv

Brookie
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Reply with quote  #3 
I think curmudgeon is probably correct. I could not fathom DNR stocking a trout that might even be sick
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Fins

Channel Catfish
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Reply with quote  #4 
I have caught several like that and ate them too.  We always assumed they got caught up in the bars of the concrete pond and got deformed. 
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Shep

Brookie
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Reply with quote  #5 
I have seen mutants for many years of some shape or form.
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mikie

Smallmouth Bass
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Reply with quote  #6 
from Wikipedia:

Whirling disease afflicts juvenile fish (fingerlings and fry) and causes skeletal deformation and neurological damage. Fish "whirl" forward in an awkward, corkscrew-like pattern instead of swimming normally, find feeding difficult, and are more vulnerable to predators. The mortality rate is high for fingerlings, up to 90% of infected populations, and those that do survive are deformed by the parasites residing in their cartilage and bone. They act as a reservoir for the parasite, which is released into water following the fish's death. M. cerebralis is one of the most economically important myxozoans in fish, as well as one of the most pathogenic. It was the first myxosporean whose pathology and symptoms were described scientifically.[4] The parasite is not transmissible to humans.

So, I guess you can consume it.
m

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LeeO

Brookie
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Reply with quote  #7 
Selenium is another source of fish deformations
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